Update: October 21, 2020   3:15 pm

focus

1. Increasing movement throughout the day

Anything and everything is good! Choose ease and frequency to accumulate movement. Avoid doing things to the point of fatigue- you need to have enough to at least maintain your current daily life and be able to get up out of chairs without additional difficulty.

2. Practice Nasal breathing throughout the day

This is one of the only ways to help calm down the nervous system and help it to feel less threatened. You want this to be your most relaxed breathing, so don't force it to the point where breathing rate increases or it feels scary. Slowly build comfort with how it feels. The tongue should have a resting place on the roof of the mouth which opens the airway in the throat (and will probably pull the head back a bit too). Feel for (not by force), the allowance of the rib cage to expand laterally and behind you, so that the chest may 'rest' and do less of the respirating. Practicing this might be easiest in bed before sleeping when you are most relaxed and comfortable. Again, this is a slow accumulation of practice and familiarity.

notes

An Idea for Incorporating Movement with Breathing Practice

- Try humming a tune (or just small sections of it) while you go through exercises and movements.

Sitting Down/Getting up

- Make sure to use anything that you need (stable furniture + arms) to make the process feel as secure as possible. As able, use arms as assistance to support your leg position, rather than using your arms to avoid using the legs.

This is to reduce fear and anxiety associated with this task as much as possible. The more fear left unmanaged will make the body more protective/rigid and therefore movement becomes more difficult. There needs to be a bit of coaxing the self into a feeling of safety (when you are in a stable place/position).

- Use gentle 'tapping' on the legs before getting up.

This is to provide more sensory feedback into the area/help stimulate the legs - 'wake them up'.

 

Roller Chair

- Make sure to back it up into a cabinet/wall so that it will not move unexpectedly when you are trying to sit down or get up.

Dining Chair

- Make sure to face the table so that you may use both hands pressing down onto the table to assist you.

10/21/20

Nervous System Help [At the beginning and end]

- Wiggling/Rocking (Gentle rhythmic/repetitive movement that feels soothing/relaxing).

- Nasal breathing (relax and sink into chair)

- Tapping self gently

Foot  [Increase Sensitivity and Control]

- Toe Spreading.

- Toe Relaxing & extending (left side especially. Used a wood block under the toes for more feedback on relaxation/movement).

- Heel Taps & Toe Taps, try to keep a rhythmic beat. (Flatten the forefoot into and relax the toes, to lift the heel off).

* When seated with feet on the floor, try to keep knees aligned above heels, as opposed to bowing outward.

Leg Movement  [Increase Safe Ranges and Variability]

- Weight-shifting hips, try to mimic your preferred sitting position (right side bias), on the other side. Use arms to help.

- Knee-lift + hold and breathe/relax, use majority of body to support the position (75%), lifted leg is (25% of the effort).

- Leg-crossing + hold and breathe/relax, pause and hold/guide it with arms if need be to ensure safe feelings.

Full Body Movement  [Increase Safety/Stress Management]

- Getting out of chair, use arms to support/help. 

- Getting out of dining chair, use arms to support/help by pressing down on the table in front of you. Make sure you always feel steady and have others help you if that makes you feel safer. (Keep shifting hips to get them over your feet).

* This is a compare and contrast of the same movement to familiarize your center of mass and base of support, in relation to arm position (helping from behind you vs in front of you).

10/14/20

Nervous System Help

- Wiggling/Rocking (Gentle rhythmic/repetitive movement that feels soothing/relaxing).

- Nasal breathing (relax and sink into chair)

- Tapping self gently

Foot  [Increase Sensitivity and Variability]

- Toe Spreading.

- Heel Taps, try to keep a rhythmic beat. (Flatten the forefoot into and relax the toes, to lift the heel off).

- Toe Taps, try to keep a rhythmic beat. (Heel presses into floor to help assist forefoot coming up).

* When feet are on the floor, try to keep knees aligned above heels, as opposed to bowing outward.

Leg Movement  [Increase Safety and Variability]

- Weight-shifting hips, try to mimic your preferred sitting position (right side bias), on the other side. Use arms to help.

- Knee-lift, think about lifting from underneath the leg and more internally (glute).

- Leg-crossing, ensure feelings of safety as the leg moves, pause and hold/guide it with arms if need be. 

- Leg extension, from floor to on top of ottoman and back.

- Wood block version of above; grab block with toes and carry it to the top of the ottoman.

* When moving a single leg, it will be easier if weight is loaded into the opposite hip first (as in weight-shifting hips, above).

Torso & Arm Movement  [Increase Safety/Managing Stress]

- Wood block stacking (at dining table). Try to complete all six blocks up and back down, one at a time, each hand.

- Wood block seated rotation, moving a wood stack (two blocks) from one side table to the other, each hand. 

10/07/20

Nervous System Help

- Nasal Breathing Technique

- Tapping Self Gently

Foot Movement + Increase Sensitivity

- Toe Spreading

- Heel Raises (spread toes and flatten them into the ground to lift the heel off)

Leg Movement + Increase Sensitivity

- Leg extension

- Knees Together-Apart (feet on floor)

- Ankle Circles (both directions. Feet can be on floor if need be)